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. what we took away from that was he was speaking about the protection of the environment. he said when men fail in this responsibility, that leads to destruction and hearts become hard. it is not just concern us as in the catholics, it concerns everybody. the protection of the whole of creation, the beauty of creation, it he hearkened back to st. francis of assisi. he said for all those who have responsibility, and we take that to mean the kings and the sovereigns and the heads of state assembled in front of him here at st. peter's, then it is important that they are the protectors of creation. joining me to discuss some of those teams is a former italian senator. you followed -- we followed together this mass very closely. looking at those themes, what do you think the pope was trying to say? his message was quite explicit. >> it was his number one policy issue number environment, which was very striking. because he chose to say so repeatedly. then the taking care. arertheme was joseph, the of his time. it was also a very conciliatory approach. he said this applies beyond christianity
, the economic, political and social environment, all men and woman of goodwill, we are all protectors of creation. >> reporter: he spent an hour and a half greeting dignitaries and then retreat treated to the vatican and took to the most modern mode of communication to address the rest of us. he tweeted. true power is service. the pope must serve all people, especially the poor, the weak, the vulnerable. what a celebration. >>> still to come, washington state picked a pot czar. the weed warden comes out front because where else would you go as the weed warden? >>> explosives and other weapons next to a body in the dorm room and that video of that discovery, we have it for you and the verdict in the case of a woman charged with murdering her own grandson. >> 911, what's your emergency? >> i've just been shot. >> what? >> i've just been shot. >> where are you at? okay. how did you get shot? who shot you? >> my grandmother shot me. >> your grandmother and grandpa shot you? >> my grandma. i'm going to die. [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of
need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> this is a fox news alert. a killer is on the loose and a manhunt is underway right now in colorado. the state's top prison official was shot to death at the front door of his own home. now police are trying to track down the killer. for the latest, jeff cramer from the el paso county sheriff's office joins us. >> good evening, how are you. >> greta: i'm well. i know you have a big task at hand and do you have a person of interest who you're looking for? >> well, we don't. unfortunately there's no known suspect in this case at this time. our investigators remain very busy at this hour to continue to gather information and go through information and try to determine what the strongest lead might be in this case, but at this point there's no suspect that's been identified, but obviously that's something that we hope to accomplish relatively so
flying about 70 satellites. so we're pretty familiar with the space environment and the risks it entails. as a global fleet operator serving both commercial and government customers, reliability and continuity of service are our highest priorities. whether it's uav operations over afghanistan or the final game of the ncaa tournament or financial statements that have to be transferred securely around the world, um, we know that our customers expect flawless performance. to deliver this level of performance, we have to daily deal with a range of threats. probably a highest priority for us today is radio frequency interference. many times it's accidental, sometimes intentional. space debris and other challenges of space flight, cyber attacks, solar weather, space systems reliability, the fact that we today don't have an affordable technical solution for refueling and repairing satellites on orbit and last but not least, an international launch industry that's far from robust. now, our economy depends on the ability to create and instantly distribute vast amounts of data around the planet. s
that they may create and raise in the best environment. >> reporter: the other case presents a challenge to doma, the defense of marriage act, passed by congress 17 years ago. it blocks federal recognition of same-sex couples in states where they are allowed to marry denying them 1,000 federal benefits that other married couples get. it's being challenged by 83-year-old edie windsor of new york when they are spouse died and left her the estate, she got a tax bill for $360,000. >> if the federal government recognized the marriage it would have been zero. >> reporter: president obama now says it is unconstitutional. >> the basic principle that america is founded on, the idea that we're all created equal, applies to everybody. regardless of sexual orientation. >> reporter: house republicans are now defending doma in court. >> the administration doesn't get to decide what's constitutional. the supreme court does. and our financing a lawsuit was to make sure that the proper forum was used to make sure we know what's constitutional and what isn't. >> reporter: the court hears the doma case on wednesda
, very threatening environment, it's very black out here, very dark. bill: a child escaping a crash, but finding herself in new danger when she's forced to find help in the dead of night. heather: and the future of the republican party, karl rove weighing in, why he is saying, don't give up just yet. bill: 10:30 in new york. karl rove over the weekend arguing that the republican party isn't over just yet, shooting down any suggestion that the party is past its praoeup. >> let's be clear, before we assign the republican party to the dust bin of history, 30 out of 50 governors in the united states are republicans. republicans have elected in 2010 the largest number of state legislators since 1920. the majority of state legislators are republicans. we have two robust parties, each with their own problems. the republican party has its problems, the democratic party has its problems and we are likely to see a competitive, political environment for decades to come. bill: i want to talk about this with former arizona senator jon kyl, a fox news contributor. welcome back here. >> thanks, go
the environment, the weak and the poor in today's installation mass at the vatican. seep your foreign affairs correspondent amy kellogg has highlights from rome. >> did a couple of laps at st. peter's square and got out with a disabled man in with crowd of 200,000 people. then there was a homily. >> let us never forget, that authentic power is service. and that the pope when exercising power also must enter ever more boldly in that service, which has the raidient culmination on the cross. >> the feast day of st. joseph, the new pope hit hard on the scene, protecting and looking after others. >> i think the pope saying also tenderness is not weakness, which is great. meaning saying it's good to have a heart. it's not weakness on your part to care about those two are left out, who are sick. lonely. who are poor. >> earlier pope francis took possession of his new fisherman's ring, symbol of st. peter or the stole made of sheep's wool, recalling the good shepherd with the flock on his shoulders. member of the u.s. congressional delegation feels confident there will be active interfaith outreach u
another, of the environment. let us not allow that time for destruction and death accompany our journey of this world. >> pope francis' homily. a man whose middle name is francis, named after francis of assissi, just like the new pope. every man called francis. >> and you were named after francis of assissi, as the new pope. >> well, growing up in our house, francis of assissi was right up there with the virgin mary because of what he stood for, his concern for the poor, environment, i mean, this guy was way ahead of his time. >> the pope tweeted today true power and service all people, especially the poor. that is his reputation. what do you want to say about the new pope? >> i want to be optimistic right now. some things that he said, like all the other bishops, about gay marriage and abortion, you know, they're just not in this century yet. but this man's approach is very different. and i was thinking the other day that i remember back when gorbachav was named and they said oh, he's the same as the other guys. he changed the world. >> and this is giving you hope and giving me hope. >
creation," pope benedict xvi called upon the faithful, and i quote -- "to protect the environment and to safeguard natural resources and the climate, while at the same time taking into due account the solidarity we owe to those living in the poorer areas of our world and to future generations." in his inaugural mass this morning, pope francis said, and i quote -- "please, i would like to ask all those who have positions of responsibility in economic, political and social life and all men and women of goodwill, let us be protectors of creation, protectors of god's plannen scribed in nature -- plan inscribed in nature, protectors of one another and of the environment. as early news reports indicated, the new pope chose his papal name, francis, out of respect for st. francis' sense of obligation to god's creation, and he noted in one of his very earliest comments that our relationship with god's creation is not so good right now. and of course, the pope is not the only one. ecumenical patriot remark bartholomew 1 of constantinople, the spiritual leader of orthodox christians, urges u
that he understands the context of circumstances, the environment they live in. demonstrate that he gets their fears. but also reach out at the same point and say, there is a way, given everything that israel does, given israel's capacity in fact to do things there is a way to still work for peace and there's a reason to try to do so. >> jeffrey here, coined the phrase, operation desert schmooze for this trip. i've been using it all day. it's been picked up everywhere, jeffrey. how far -- >> at least i can contribute something to the middle east debate. >> how far can you get with schmooze alone? >> this is the question. the acid test comes not right now, tomorrow he'll lay a wreath at hertzle's grave, the founder of zionism. he's doing all the things that one would have to do to gain the trust of the israeli people. the test comes when a month from now, the netanyahu government announces it's going to be building more apartments in some contested land on the west bank. and so i don't understand how the, a better relationship is going to actually affect that on a policy level. maybe they
to you and to many israelis, israel must embed itself in its environment. israel must be integrated into the region as a good citizen as long as the palestinians, and i'm both as a scholar of the middle east and also as an american. as long as the palestinians remain disinherited, they will be there peace and stability. israel is very powerful. israel is a fortress. but all of us would like to see the jewish community fully integrated into that part of the world by reaching a settlement based on security and peace and reconciliation. this is the way to go. and abbas, anyone else. the reality, i'm choosing my words very carefully. the israelis will never find a better partner than mahmoud abbas who has fully accepted a settlement based on a two-state solution. full security for israel and dignity for the palestinians and a viable state on the, what we call the 23% of what used to be historic palestine. >> abbas has called israel a land of jesus and mohamed. so i'm not sure he is interested in any israeli sovereignty. >> professor, thank you very much. >>> up next, chris christie gets
protectors of creation of the plan of god written in nature, protectors of one another, of the environment. let us not allow that science of destruction and death accompany our journey of this world. >> pope francis' homily at his installation today. back here with michael moore and fellow catholic, i may add, and a man whose middle name is francis, named after francis of assisi. >> my father was francis. >> really? >> yes. >> and you were named after francis of assisi, as the new pope was. how do you feel about that? >> francis of assisi was, you know, right up there with the virgin mary because of the things that he stood for, his concern for the poor, environment. i mean, this guy was way ahead of his time. >> the pope tweeted true power is service. the pope must serve all people, especially the poor. that is his reputation, looking after the poor. what do you think of the new pope? >> i want to be optimistic. things that he said like all the other bishops about gay marriage and abortion, you know, they are just not in this century yet, but this man's approach is very different, and i -
people together. partly it was the environment and the sicks that we had to confront -- circumstances that we had to cold front. as nk what has changed is she said we would work longer weeks and people were there for longer periods of time. the venues for communication were at hand. she will remember this well. we used to have two lunch tables that were just for senators and you sit family style. people would have lunch together. for whatever reason that lunchroom was closed. we used to have social events where we getting together and one was around our spouses and we would salute our spouses. we would do things like that. people now leave washington more routinely on thursday or fridays and they don't come back until monday or tuesday. you are left to combovepb on wednesday. you condition govern a country as big and sophisticated a this is. they were in session for 11 days in february. partly, we have to ground the airplane. you have to stay here. i like the suggestion that maybe what we out to do is have blocks of time where you don't go home. you're there from january to june then
, they're trying to do their job, and they've created an open environment, an environment envisioned in our constitution, but they're finding themselves falling, if you will, back on this whole question of you've got to hit certain numbers, af gyou've goto force the numbers. that was legitimate for the supreme court. this is a president who picks people to promote because they support his ideology rather than the rule of law. >> this is a man headed up the civil rights division at which the inspector general concluded there's a racial hostility within that department that remains deeply divided over whether cases enforcing rights under the voting rights laws should ever be brought or should be brought with any consistency, where the victims in those voting cases are white and the defendants are black. that's under mr. perez and even some on the left have been saying, enough is enough. eric holder personally needs to answer for that ig's report. although it's gotten very scant coverage. so do you believe that that is a potential issue for mr. perez on his confirmation to head up the l
to reflect the global security environment. the military, and the growing budget, currently the current strategy as well. starting with the strategic guidance issued in january 2012. it seems that we are falling into a trap of creating strategies entirely on how quickly we can cut defense budgets rather than as a result give an honest assessment. i am very much concerned. i always thought that the major mission of the federal government is to protect the homeland. we have to get back to that mentality and recognize the threat and you guys are in the right position to do that. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, senator. admiral? >> chairman, ranking member, members of the committee. thank you very much for taking time to hear from myself, general jacoby and general kelly. i always say that i feel safe when i'm with a big marine general and a big army general. it is probably the safest and i could be up your wet. thank you for having us and putting us together for this panel. as the chairman mentioned, rounding out for years in my current position. before that i was lucky enough to b
. it addresses the need for a national military strategy to reflect the global security environment. the military, and the growing budget, currently the current strategy as well. starting with the strategic guidance issued in january 2012. it seems that we are falling into a trap of creating strategies entirely on how quickly we can cut defense budgets rather than as a result give an honest assessment. i am very much concerned. i always thought that the major mission of the federal government is to protect the homeland. we have to get back to that mentality and recognize the threat and you guys are in the right position to do that. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, senator. admiral? >> chairman, ranking member, members of the committee. thank you very much for taking time to hear from myself, general jacoby and general kelly. i always say that i feel safe when i'm with a big marine general and a big army general. it is probably the safest and i could be up your wet. thank you for having us and putting us together for this panel. as the chairman mentioned, rounding out for years in my curren
quite a distance in a threatening environment. it's he very black out here, dark, and steep and brushy and there are coyotes in the background. >> harris: oh, my gosh, she was only nine, i mentioned that. by the time the emergency crews got it the crash, her dad was dead and that girl was taken to the hospital with minor injuries. and federal agents carrying out a massive sweep in california looking for laughing gas, raiding more than a dozen businesses suspected in a nitrous oxide ring. otherwise known as laughing gas. and users inhale the laughing gas to try to get a cheap and dangerous high. >> we have armed robberies conducted by gangs stealing the gas from each other, it can be taken home or to a large underground party, balloons are sold, $3, $10 a pop. and a lot of money to be made. >> and they took gas street value, 20 million dollars. >> a driver shot and killed outside of papa john's pizza. on this fox trip across america. oklahoma, police say the victim was unloading pizza dough from the back of his truck when his partner, who was in the restaurant, heard what sounded like a
america's role in the world and it rapidly changing strategic environment, and about america's interests looking forward. and finally i would add the qualification for today's discussion. unlike most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside conventional wisdom when the issue warranted it, taking some risks with his own reputation. general mcmaster is one of a very come one of the most prominent of a very small, very elite, very important class of individuals who have earned the title warrior soldier. he, too, has been willing to critically examine the past, and has done so with such power that rather than ended his military career, the work is ultimately advanced it. his ph.d thesis contained widely influential book, dereliction of duty, lyndon johnson, robert mic, the joint chiefs mic, the joint chiefs of staff, and the lies that led to vietnam. i think the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. is equally known for brilliance as a combat commander, earning a silver star for leadership in the 1991 gulf war
's environment where interest rates, in general, are so low, why take a chance? you know, it's not just on that side of the atlantic. you know, we got 0% interest rates in america. why leave money on deposit in a bank to get 0% when there's inflation, and, you know, nose are the two largest banks in cypress that failed. our two largest banks, bank of america and citi bank have over $2 trillion in total deposits. the fdic has near $25 billion in treasuries. if our largest banks were to fail, we don't have anywhere near reserves to come close to the insurance deposits let alone all deposits. sandra: let's get jordan in here, an analyst in our power panel tonight. jordan, i guess this here is going to be used -- this bailout will be used as a template for future bailouts, and that investors say, well, my money's not safe, i'm going to take it and go somewhere else. do you believe that to be the case? >> right. no, not currently just because when i look at the global markets, if you review the major european nations like germany or france, you don't see the dee tier ration that there's -- d
people together. i think partly it was the circumstances and the environment we had to confront. devissive had very times. the schedule has changed a lot. we would work longer weeks and people were there for a longer period of time. the venues for communication were much more readily at hand. we had -- we used to have two lunch tables that are just for senators and you'd is it family style and people would have lunch together. and for whatever reason that lunchroom was closed. we used to have social events where we get together and one was around our spouses and we'd salute or spouse. we'd do things like that. but i think the single biggest thing people leave washington so much more routinely on thursday or friday and don't come back till monday or tuesday and you are left to govern on wednesday. you can't govern a country as big and sophisticated as this one is one or two days a week. they have been in session 11 days in february which we've got to ground the airplane. we're going to have to say you're going to have to stay here. maybe what we ought to do is have blocks of tim
life could have, indeed, once existed there. >> for the first time we are seeing an ancient environment on mars which is habitable. it just looks different than the planet does today instead of red, it's gray. there was plenty of water. >> curiosity landed on mars back in august, you might recall. the mission last one martian year. that translates into 687 earth days, shepard. we're about halfway through. >> shepard: all right. casey stegall in dallas tonight. cabin owners are now looking for what's left after a huge fire ripped through a mountain side resort. and that tops our news across newark. america. tennessee, the fire broke out late sunday night at a cabin near the north carolina border. heavy winds quickly fanned the flames to dozens of other structures. black hawk helicopters help battled thing all day yesterday. officials say some rain fall last night finally helped contain the thing. it charred some 200 acres and destroyed more than 60 cabins. nobody hurt. maryland. a massive water main break beneath a busy intersection north of d.c. the pipe burst last night sending water 2
there is something that's happening in the environment that's obviously causing more cases of autism. i just don't think you can say that. despite the fact that the headlines are going to say, you know, 1 in 50 as compared to 1 in 88, this is now 2% of children in america. i still think that, you know, we know that the numbers are high. we know that over longer periods of time, over decades, they've gone up. and i think the bigger focus is while there is increased awareness and diligence about this, it probably needs to happen earlier in life. the ideal thing with these kids actually be diagnosed, if they have autism, as young as 18 months or even 2 years old, anderson. >> all right. dr. sanjay gupta, appreciate it, thanks. >> thank you. >>> if you want to hear more about this story, go to cnn.com. up next, new developments in a cold case that likely didn't need to go cold. what police in mississippi are doing now that cnn's drew griffin started asking questions about an unsolved hit and run killing of an african-american man from three years ago. >>> plus it was his job to protect priceless wor
into that school building because it will create a better environment for success and help keep that neighborhood solid and grow things. >> governor snyder, thanks so much for talking with us. chris, back to you. >>> rehema, governor snyder, thank you. >>> and you're looking live at ayman, jo o oman, jordan. here are president obama and king abdullah of jordan. this is the final country that president obama will visit on his middle east trip. let's go to them now. >> all jordanians to welcome you and your distinguished delegation back here in jordan. i fondly remember your visit here several years ago when you were a senator, it is a great delight to welcome you back to jordan as the president of the united states enjoying your second term. we're delighted with the in-depth discussions that were very, very fruitful on the strategic and historic partnership. and you've been an old friend as has the united states for so many decades. we are very grateful, to you, sir, and the administration as well as congress and the american people for the continuous support that has been shown to jordan over so
-qe and nonzero interest rate policy environment. the federal reserve has drilled rates down to zero because they cannot get gdp to grow because of tight regulation on the middle class. with zero percent rates, the saver earns next to noing, and the typical american family has no access to the american credit markets. >> i think we have a table we want to put up. you're basically saying that u.s. deposits are a little different from the cyprus story. u.s. savers have been badly damaged by the federal reserve policy. >> it's basically like a tax. if interest rates were at 2%, u.s. savers would earn 2% a year. last four years, they would have compounded out at 9%. instead, their earnings are basically zero, and they're underwriting the profits of the banks. >> jimmy, your response? >> you look globally at long-term interest rates, where are they going globally? down, down, down, even where banks aren't doing quantitative easing. those low rates reflect a weak economy. people aren't one thing. sure, they're savers, but they're also equity investors, who have done very nicely of late. if we foll
the best environment we're going to have under this president's term is going to be between now and august 1st. we're going to move through the sequester process on the senate floor either tonight or tomorrow. we'll pass the bill that funds government at the lower sequester level. i think that's a major victory. we'll have the budgets next week, then we'll have a period of time of about four months before the debt ceiling is hit. i think that's the most fertile time for us. i think what republicans want to see, wolf, they want to see a 75-year actuary soundness. we want to make sure the programs are going to be there for the future. the president knows we want to make sure these programs are there, and what the presidents wants, obviously, is some additional revenue. i believe there's a possibility if we could get the 75-year soundness on medicare and social security with appropriate changes and reforms, i think there may be a way through full tax reform to do something that will generate revenue and fit the needs of both sides, and that's what i'm hopeful is going to happen over the next
that but certainly underlines the political nature of the administration's handling of the post-benghazi environment. and i can't wait to read these memos. i'm sure they will be a real treat. i think it will simply increase demands in congress for answers about the real facts of benghazi that after six months we still haven't gotten skbri mean, the thoughts on hacking, everybodies that -- everybody has their feeling how this should be handled the law doesn't crack down on people's ability to tap into private exchanges. one thing i think it truly highlights here, if there is a need in social media, even extending into the law breakers, to learn more about what happened, it does, does it not, say something about the energy in this country to produce some truth in this matter? >> yeah. i think there should be more protection for intellectual property on the internet, for people's own communications but i certainly have no faith in the privacy protections now. that is why my e-mails are pretty boring. this is a, dealing with sensitive matters of national security does raise a question, i think, whether
to assume the role of protectors. >> we are all protectors of protectors of one another, of the environment. let us not allow signs of destruction and death accompany our journey of this world. >> reporter: five hundred priests dispensed communion to the crowd. at the conclusion of the two-hour mass, pope francis greeted the international heads-of-state in attendance, including vice president joe biden, who lead the u-s delegation. francis assumes his role at one of the busiest and holiest times in the catholic calendar. next sunday is palm sunday. easter follows, one week later. elizabeth corridan kron4 news. >> now for today's market update. numbers were mixed on wall street. even after lawmakers in cyprus rejected an unpopular bailout plan here are the closing numbers. the dow was up three points. after being down as much as 70 points today. the nasdaq lost eight points. and the s-and-p fell three points. dow: >> jacqueline: we conceive of rainfall just offshore. it will move inhis evening. more about [ teen ] times are good, aren't they, kids? it's nice having u-verse, isn't it? see bac
money at this current time in this environment on capitol hill kind of goes against the grain but that is the key way that we can convert our good intentions to real, live aid and make a difference in people's lives on the ground. >> in my testimony are some of the ways we are rushing to help communities who are strained by the influx of refugees, and working with the governments of both these countries to provide additional support. it is an important question, one we are deeply focused on. >> thank you, mr. chairman and folks on the panel for your attendance. ambassador ford, i am wondering regarding the redline, i want some specifics -- what are the possible consequences, and i share your current skepticism, what are the range of possible consequences the american people can expect from the administration as a response? >> congressman, i really do not want to speculate here about hypothetical situations. what i do want to underline that the president has said there will be consequences and that we will seek strongly that the people who use chemical weapons be held accountab
strategic environment and about america's interest forward. finally i would add as a qualification for today's discussion, unlike most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside conventional wisdom when the issue warranted it, taking some risk with his own reputation. general mcmaster is one of the most prominent of a very small, very easily come a very important class of individuals who have earned the title warrior soldier. he, too, has been willing to critically examine the past, and has done so with such power that rather than in his military career, the work has ultimately advanced it. his ph.d. thesis became a widely influential book. the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. fors equally known brilliance as a combat commander, earning a silver star in the 1991 gulf war and even wider recognition for his success in battles in the iraq war. in the rest of that war, he went back-and-forth between field command an important staff positions culminating in his role as the leader of general petraeus's brain trus
collection . in conflict and post-conflict environments, this is especially vital as communities need reason to believe in the possibility of a better future and establish trust in opposition leadership . at usaid we are working quickly through usaid's office of transition initiatives to provide the soc with support to respond rapidly to immediate requests from local councils -- including the provision of emergency power, clean water, heaters, and educational supplies for children in strategically selected areas -- as well as support strategic transition initiatives that restore basic services . as ambassador ford has detailed, $54 million in non-lethal assistance, of the $115 million committed, is already at work through state and usaid- supported mechanisms to support, train, equip, and connect a network of civil society activists, civilian opposition leaders, and emergent democratic institutions . usaid has prioritized help for syrian women to play a meaningful role in the country's transition through training and support for coalition-building . working with the state department, usaid r
,000 iraqis, 600,000, you can find the number, what was the long-term impact of that on the environment, the water and health? what happens when someone lives in constant fear of becoming collateral damage? today iraq is a sad shadow of a society that once boasted the best infrastructure in the region, instability and violence fester on this very day and now it teeters on the brink of an inevitable civil war. this is the legacy of our last 10 years, and i still don't understand why. i hope this anniversary will remind us that a whole new generation of veterans are waiting to help reintegrate into the civilian life. i believe it's time to elevate our level of commitment to these veterans. i'm introducing a bill to create a commission on veterans' care, to investigate what we as a society can do to help our men and women come home. i hope it will remind us that no lives, regardless of nationality, should be taken lightly. i hope it will remind us as to why the next time. and i hope it won't take another war to get that answer. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore:
environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-411-7040 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. bill: you're about to hear from a brave teenager outsmarting the burglars. she's 15. she was home when she heard the intruder sneak inside, she grabbed a phone, ducked inside of a closet to hide and called 911. bill: and they did. at one point you could even hear the burglars, coming within inches of where she was hiding. the teen said she stayed calm, and she stayed quiet. bill: great job by that operator too. only moments later, the trio of teenage burglars walked out of the house and into the hands of the police. cops say they may be behind a slew other burglaries in that neighborhood. heather: well, the killing of colorado's prison chief putting the spotlight on the potential dangers of his job. tom clements was murdered on his own doorstep, it happened on tuesday. autho
. given the environment, the ability to have serious discussion that is could lay a basis for moving forward i think may well have been done in this trip and we'll see what comes now in the aftermath of the secretary of state. the measure of the trip won't be what happens this week or next, it's going to be what happens over the next couple months. >> yeah. guys, to both of you, the president said during the press conference with king abdullah, that the u.s. is in a no-win situation in syria. it's criticized when it takes military action. it's krit siced for not taking military action. so what then are the options on the table, martin? >> well, the americans are insisting they need to act within the international community. it can't be up to the united states always to send in troops, and i don't really think that people in the region are expecting that, but there needs to be some kind of effort made to enable -- my feeling is a clear winner in syria. we're all talking about the emphasis is on helping the resistance against president assad reach victory. obama keeps saying it's not m
. the outcome of these particular systems are uknown for the environment. it would be beneficial to the assistance to knock down long- range missiles. host: are you familiar with this? guest: you probably want a meteorologist to talk about these questions. one comment i would make is that weather systems are so enormously powerful compared to even nuclear-weapons in terms of the amount of energy that the idea of modifying them is a daunting proposition. even if we are thinking in non- military terms about hurricanes, my understanding of the problem is that we are quite a ways away from being able to do that. one thing we do not understand is the implications of any intervention leawood try to carry out. these weather systems are intervention we would try to carry up. these budde systems are enormous. not since the debate is not important for the issue is irrelevant. i think we are a ways away from being able to do things with the weather. host: this point on our twitter host: let us go to ramie from baltimore, maryland. caller: a couple of quick points. i think we are talking abo
green. but his motivation for a planer existence wasn't just about money or environment. >> i think life's about experience and about connection and about relationships. so i think you want to sort of maximum your time focused on that and minimize your time focused on acquiring more stuff and dealing with it. >> now, graham hill does acknowledge that if you are married or if you have a child, the minimalist lifestyle becomes a lot tougher. >>> starbucks' ceo howard schultz, him having an opinion on same-sex marriage, is it bad for business? you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. exciting and would always come max and pto my rescue. bookstore but as time passed, i started to notice max just wasn't himself. and i knew he'd feel better if he lost a little weight. so
jobs, clean up the environment, and be able to keep our way of life going on the chesapeake bay. so, madam president, you can see why today we just had three great marylanders, each doing a very different thing, but what i'm so proud of with, you know, captain cullen, larry symms, christina quigley is that each in their own way was trying to make a difference, wanted to protect america. the other was to protect jobs and a way of life on the chesapeake bay. and the other to inspire young women not only to be ready for the playing fields of la crosse but for the playing fields of life. all three, in her own way, were inspirational leaders. all three, in their own way, made a difference in the lives of the people that they came in touch w i just want to say, god bless them and god treat them kindly and may their souls rest in peace. madam president, i yield the floor. ms. mikulski: madam president, i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: quorum call:
are looking at that environment and saying it just doesn't work at the very top if we also want to have children. and so what we have to do is change the structures of the work force. we have got to say to our companies -- and i think this is the biggest feminist revolution. if we can change the shape of that border and table to make it more family friendly and implement more flexible work programs and have careers up and down uncan dial up and dial back again at certain stages. actually those companies find the productivity increases. the companies that say to women and to men we don't care about your input. we care about your output. where and when you work for doesn't matter but what you do produce matters. that works so well for women. in those circumstances, productivity rises for the company and you keep women in the work force. >> i venture to say we might be more productive when we have small children because we're on fire and trying to keep it all going and we are not checked out. every argument made here at the table is valid and i think the bigger point here, whether it's the
strategic environment and about america's interest looking forward. as aly i would add qualification for today's discussion, unlike most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside conventional wisdom when the issue warranted it, taking some risk with his own reputation. theral mcmaster is one of most prominent of a very small, very easily come a very important class of individuals who have earned the title warrior soldier. he, too, has been willing to critically examine the past, and has done so with such power that rather than in his military career, the work has ultimately advanced it. his ph.d. thesis became a widely influential book. the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. he is equally known for brilliance as a combat commander, earning a silver star in the 1991 gulf war and even wider recognition for his iraqss in battles in the war. in the rest of that war, he went back-and-forth between field command an important staff positions culminating in his role as the leader of general petraeus's brain
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